Video

Here are a few videos that not only show some of the services Last Salute provides but also the strong support of our mission from great heroes like Medal of Honor recipients. These heroes along with many others wish to honor those we lay to rest.

Medal of Honor Recipient Robert Patterson fires Last Salute’s cannon


For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Patterson (then Sp4c.) distinguished himself while serving as a fire team leader of the 3d Platoon, Troop B, during an assault against a North Vietnamese Army battalion which was entrenched in a heavily fortified position. When the leading squad of the 3d Platoon was pinned down by heavy interlocking automatic weapon and rocket propelled grenade fire from 2 enemy bunkers, Sgt. Patterson and the 2 other members of his assault team moved forward under a hail of enemy fire to destroy the bunkers with grenade and machine gun fire. Observing that his comrades were being fired on from a third enemy bunker covered by enemy gunners in 1-man spider holes, Sgt. Patterson, with complete disregard for his safety and ignoring the warning of his comrades that he was moving into a bunker complex, assaulted and destroyed the position. Although exposed to intensive small arm and grenade fire from the bunkers and their mutually supporting emplacements. Sgt. Patterson continued his assault upon the bunkers which were impeding the advance of his unit. Sgt. Patterson singlehandedly destroyed by rifle and grenade fire 5 enemy bunkers, killed 8 enemy soldiers and captured 7 weapons. His dauntless courage and heroism inspired his platoon to resume the attack and to penetrate the enemy defensive position. Sgt. Patterson’s action at the risk of his life has reflected great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army

Medal of Honor Recipient Hershel Woodrow “Woody” Williams fires Last Salute’s cannon at VFW Post


Medal of Honor Recipient Hershel Woodrow “Woody” Williams was at Iwo Jima where he distinguished himself with actions “above and beyond the call of duty” — for which he would be awarded the Medal of Honor. Landing on February 21, 1945, Williams, by then a corporal, distinguished himself two days later when American tanks, trying to open a lane for infantry, encountered a network of reinforced concrete pillboxes.[1] Williams went forward alone with his 70-pound (32 kg) flamethrower to attempt the reduction of devastating machine gun fire from the unyielding positions.

Harry Truman congratulates Hershel Williams on being awarded the Medal of Honor, 5 October 1945
Covered by only four riflemen, he fought for four hours under terrific enemy small-arms fire and repeatedly returned to his own lines to prepare demolition charges and obtain serviced flame throwers. He returned to the front, frequently to the rear of hostile emplacements, to wipe out one position after another.[1] At one point, a wisp of smoke alerted him to the air vent of a Japanese bunker, and he approached close enough to put the nozzle of his flamethrower through the hole, killing the occupants.[2] On another occasion, he was charged by enemy riflemen who attempted to stop him with bayonets and he killed them with a burst of flame from his weapon.[1]
These actions occurred on the same day as the raising of the U.S. flag on the island’s Mount Suribachi,

An enormous crowd of people gathered to pay their last respects to PFC Tyler Wechsler.  This video is the final part of the ceremony.

Last Salute was extremely honored to fold a flag owned by our dear friends the Palmisanos which was presented to them for their grandfather’s service in the European theatre during World War 1. The flag had been damaged during hurricane Sandy and was in need of repair and refolding.

Last Salute Military Funeral Honor performing a funeral ceremony in Absecon NJ.

Chaplain Sabella from Lakehurst Naval Base christens the Last Salute Memorial Bell and anoints the Honor Guard for their mission.